Gradwatch 2017: New Designers

First up, these bold prints made from polypropylene plastic were shown by Oli Hudson of Bath Spa University. His Wise Man series “explore[s] the beginnings of our species”. He also makes films – check out his Vimeo page below.

See vimeo.com/olihudson

Oli Hudson

Risograph projects were popular this year and Ursi Tolliday, a graduate of Cambridge School of Art, made great use of the technique in a series of characterful works that explore “how different groups of people adapt and live in extremely different environments”.

See cargocollective.com/ursitollidayillustration

Ursi Tolliday
Ursi Tolliday

These ‘listening sticks’ were created by Sarah Dean from Hereford College of Arts. Apparently they are ready to be told stories – and were made for (and by) children during a workshop. “Based on Guatemalan Worry Dolls but without the ‘worry’, [they] are created to be used as a tool for mindfulness, meditation, calming, reflecting and resolving.”

See sarahdeanillustration.wordpress.com

Sarah Dean

As ever there was a strong selection of work on show at Falmouth University’s illustration stand. Highlights included well-executed ideas from Rachel SummersCarly Diep’s dark and evocative pencil illustrations, the striking collage work of Jon Clark and Thierry Porter‘s intriguing characters that can be found in his editorial projects.

See rachelsummersillustration.com, carlydiepillustration.com, jonclarkillustration.com
and thierryporter.co.uk

Carly Diep
Thierry Porter

At the Manchester School of Art stand, Caroline May’s map-inspired work made use of cut-out watercolour ‘washes’ to create landscapes; while Joshua Harrison’s collage pieces from his Fyfield Books Project were also intriguing.

See carolinemayart.com and jharrisonillustration.com

Caroline May
Caroline May
Joshua Harrison
Joshua Harrison

From the University of Portsmouth, illustrator John Lihou exhibited a series of brilliantly-realised VHS covers which “highlight the seven deadly sins of the modern world and the mayhem caused by tourists in Yellowstone National Park in the selfie generation”.