Meet the man who makes a living eating cheese

If you want to turn your passion into a full-time career, look to Will Studd – the man who made a career out of eating cheese.

Will Studd is a television star, published author and successful business owner. He’s internationally recognised in his field and was even knighted in France – all for his love of cheese.

So, how exactly does one turn a passion for cheese into a successful, globetrotting career?

“I often joke that I got into cheese because I wasn’t good at anything else,” Will revealed to Lifestyle, admitting that a false start as an accountant lead to his next job in a supermarket deli.

Will managed to work his way to the top quickly, eventually opening four upmarket food stores in his hometown of London. He was respected by locals and frequented by notable names, including Princess Diana.

It wasn’t until he moved Down Under to start a family that Will began the next chapter of his career in cheese – importing, educating and, well, fighting with the government about Australia’s opposition to raw milk cheese.

To many in the industry, Will is known as a bit of a rebel. A pioneer of the raw milk cheese movement, Will has ruffled some feathers campaigning for Australia to legalise raw milk and enable a breadth and quality of cheesemaking that can currently be found overseas in France and England.

The high point of Will’s rebellion came when he was threatened with jail for importing a case of (then illegal) Roquefort raw milk cheese. He was eventually ordered to bury the supply, which he did in a dramatic public ceremony (complete with its own funeral hearse), filmed for his TV series Cheese Slices. (Interestingly, the ruling actually threatened to derail international trade agreements, after which the Australian government was forced to legalise the sale of Roquefort cheese.)

With seven series of his self-produced television series and two published books, Will says the key to his success comes down to his passion for quality:

“I’m so successful because I’ve always tried to work with quality, in terms of product, but in terms of the TV idea, it’s been very much about education, because if you want to explain to people what good cheese is all about, what better than taking a camera and introducing them to the people who make it.”